Tuesday, 27 March 2012

Australia levels Series against West indies


 

Australia Vs  West Indies : 5th ODI
Australia 281 for 9 (Warner 69, Watson 66, Forrest 53, Russell 4-61, Roach 3-53) beat West Indies 251 (Sammy 84, Lee 3-42) by 30 runs

Somehow, a 2-2 draw seemed a fitting result for a series that was so closely fought. That was the outcome after Australia's best all-round performance of the tour so far finished in a 30-run win, although the West Indies captain Darren Sammy did his best to carry the hosts home on his shoulders with a powerful 84 that gave his team unexpected hope. But in the end, Australia had more performers: half-centuries to David Warner, Shane Watson and Peter Forrest set up a big total of 281 for 9 and Brett Lee led a disciplined bowling display to wrap up the victory.
It left the series with a sense of symmetry: it began with an Australian win, then a West Indian victory, then a tie, then a West Indies win and ended as it started, with an Australian victory. It must also have left both teams unsatisfied, Australia at their inability to gel through the middle of the series and beat the No.8-ranked ODI side, and West Indies at missing a rare opportunity to secure a series win over Australia.
Sammy nearly got them there, though. He and Andre Russell came together at 118 for 7 but they didn't give up, and Sammy blasted sixes here, there and everywhere on his way to a 20-ball half-century, equalling his own West Indian record. Even after the departure of Russell, who was lbw on review to Xavier Doherty for 41, Sammy kept the West Indian dream alive until he was the last man out, caught at deep midwicket with 31 still needed from 17 balls.
Perhaps Sammy made a tactical error by sending Australia in, considering the strong West Indian victory batting first at the same venue two days ago. His bowlers were unable to pick up cheap top-order wickets and the hosts were always on the back foot, right from the first few boundaries struck by Warner and Watson in their 118-run partnership, their first century opening stand together.
The West Indies bowlers did what they could and prevented Australia from the 300-plus score that at one stage looked inevitable, but it was eight years since West Indies had chased down such a high target in an ODI and their task looked as tall as the Pitons that dominate St Lucia's landscape. When Lee struck in each of his first two overs, local shoulders slumped even more.
Somehow, a 2-2 draw seemed a fitting result for a series that was so closely fought. That was the outcome after Australia's best all-round performance of the tour so far finished in a 30-run win, although the West Indies captain Darren Sammy did his best to carry the hosts home on his shoulders with a powerful 84 that gave his team unexpected hope. But in the end, Australia had more performers: half-centuries to David Warner, Shane Watson and Peter Forrest set up a big total of 281 for 9 and Brett Lee led a disciplined bowling display to wrap up the victory.
It left the series with a sense of symmetry: it began with an Australian win, then a West Indian victory, then a tie, then a West Indies win and ended as it started, with an Australian victory. It must also have left both teams unsatisfied, Australia at their inability to gel through the middle of the series and beat the No.8-ranked ODI side, and West Indies at missing a rare opportunity to secure a series win over Australia.
Sammy nearly got them there, though. He and Andre Russell came together at 118 for 7 but they didn't give up, and Sammy blasted sixes here, there and everywhere on his way to a 20-ball half-century, equalling his own West Indian record. Even after the departure of Russell, who was lbw on review to Xavier Doherty for 41, Sammy kept the West Indian dream alive until he was the last man out, caught at deep midwicket with 31 still needed from 17 balls.
Perhaps Sammy made a tactical error by sending Australia in, considering the strong West Indian victory batting first at the same venue two days ago. His bowlers were unable to pick up cheap top-order wickets and the hosts were always on the back foot, right from the first few boundaries struck by Warner and Watson in their 118-run partnership, their first century opening stand together.
The West Indies bowlers did what they could and prevented Australia from the 300-plus score that at one stage looked inevitable, but it was eight years since West Indies had chased down such a high target in an ODI and their task looked as tall as the Pitons that dominate St Lucia's landscape. When Lee struck in each of his first two overs, local shoulders slumped even more.

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